Training programs and rates / Lesson outline / Ground training / Training tools / Gordon's articles

Hoof Studies / Club foot and uneven heels / Laminitis and founder defined / Laminitis / founder treatment

Homepage / G.A. Equine Center / About Gordon Adair / Interview

MY HORSE WILL NOT BACK - Q/A Natural Horsemanship training Tips

© by Gordon Adair / Trainer

My twelve year old gelding refuses to back while I am on him. When I ask my horse to back he freaks out and turns around.

Bit communication is fifty percent of your control while riding. When your horse does not respond to bit pressure during the back cue, you will have a hard time stopping. To teach your horse to back off bit pressure stand next to your bridled horse. Apply bit pressure with one rein, at any hint of a backwards movement release the pressure. Repeat the procedure until your horse is comfortable.

When riding the cue for the back is your body leaning and moving backwards in the saddle. If your horse does not follow your body your hands will make contact with the bit, applying pressure against your horse. It is important for you to remember your body moving backwards is the actual cue. The bit pressure is the correction for not moving with you. For your horse to avoid the correction he should respond to your body movement.

To prevent your horse from leaning on the bit always offset your rein pressure. One rein may control sixty percent of pressure, while your other rein is controlling forty percent of the pressure. When using uneven rein pressure to back, your horse will move backwards in a circle. Backing in a circle is much safer than backing straight because slight sideways motion eliminates your horse from rearing. As your horse begins to respond to a lighter back cue he will begin to back in a straighter line.

Training programs and rates / Lesson outline / Ground training / Training tools / Gordon's articles

Hoof Studies / Club foot and uneven heels / Laminitis and founder defined / Laminitis / founder treatment

Homepage / G.A. Equine Center / About Gordon Adair / Interview

Gordon Adair is a professional natural horse trainer and riding instructor with over thirty-seven years of experience. Gordon's specialty is instructing owners with their horses, the philosophy of teaching horsemanship and communication. The ability to teach and communicate can then be used with the owners own discipline and personality. Ocala, Florida for more information

© All rights reserved. reproduction of this site in whole or part without permission is prohibited.